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Organic Vietnam Nam Lanh Estate Black Tea

Purchase Options

$19.50
113 servings, 17¢ per serving
$10.50
38 servings, 28¢ per serving
$3.50
6 servings
Quantity:
Price:
$10.50
  • Description
  • Reviews
  • Steeping
  • Health

Southeast Asia's answer to rich, malty Assam tea! This organic and Fair Trade Certified Nam Lanh Estate Black Tea hails from the banks of the Red River in Vietnam's Yen Bai province. The uniform, twisted organic loose tea leaves exhibit substantial tippiness, and yield a brew that is pleasantly rich, malty and coppery, with hints of molasses.

Although the rainforests of south China (and their indigenous tea trees) have been all but destroyed by sprawl and industrialization, efforts are afoot to preserve the rainforests just south of the border in northern Vietnam. In order to make a compelling argument to the Vietnamese government for the preservation of these native landscapes, the organic Vietnamese tea harvesting tribes of the Yen Bai province are striving to produce superior-quality "ancient tree" teas that are highly sought after on the international marketplace. Although they're still developing their green tea manufacturing technique, this very wonderful organic black tea is now being produced to help preserve Vietnam's northern rainforests.

Ingredients: organic Vietnamese black tea



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Serving Size: one rounded teaspoon (1.25) per 8 oz cup of water





Staff Perspectives

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Aubrey Says: This is indeed the Vietnamese Assam! In fact, lately I find that I am reaching for this tea instead of our Assam when I want malty black tea. If you are an Assam lover, give this a try for something new.





Write your own product review

  1. Quest for the perfect malty black...

    Posted by Monica Wilson on 13th Nov 2013

    I purchased several blacks from Arbor and have been pleased with them all. But the Vietnam is my favorite, just the right amount of matinees and astringency. I usually drink it iced but it is delicious hot too...I like lemon with mine. Lots of flavor. I'll be buying more!



  2. My new favorite

    Posted by Lauren on 20th May 2013

    This may be my new favorite tea from Arbor. It's a nice, strong, fullbodied tea that tastes slightly fruity to me. Delicious!



  3. Wonderful Breakfast Tea

    Posted by Sharon B on 14th Sep 2012

    This is the first tea from Viet Nam that I've tried -- ever -- and it is a winner! Great brisk, yet complex flavor, without bitterness even when brewed strong. A great alternative to coffee to get the morning going. Love it!



  4. What a surprise

    Posted by John from Massachusetts on 12th Apr 2012

    Being a fan of Indian and Chinese teas, and being disappointed by the Kenyan teas, I was a bit reluctant to try this, but am I glad I did! It has a very appealing scent and a very satisfying earthy flavor. It has become one of my favorites.



  5. A pleasant surprise!

    Posted by Catherine on 15th Nov 2011

    I am primarily a black tea drinker, so when I saw this tea I ordered a sample to try, as I'd never had a Vietnamese tea before. I was very pleasantly suprised by it! I agree with another reviewer in that it is more complex and fruity than an Assam - a real well rounded tea!



  6. This is my new favorite tea

    Posted by Sierra Bangs on 26th Apr 2011

    Wow! This tea is full-bodied and delicious. Also, the dry leaves smell like mint chocolate chip ice cream!



  7. Vietnam Black Is Where Its At!

    Posted by Dan K on 31st Aug 2010

    I love this tea. I drink a ton of tea at least 5 cups a day. And drink a wide variety. This is my first black tea from Vietnam though and I must say every cup I have had was amazing. Described as an answer to the rich malty Assam but to me is more complex than that. Its got a full body for sure but a fruitness similar to Ceylon but then some perfumy muscatel Darjeeling quality. Its so good I had to write this review in case anyone is wondering. All in all I am glad I got the 9 oz bag. As I will want to keep coming back for more.



  8. quite happy

    Posted by Brendan Waye on 9th Jun 2010

    I cupped Vietnam blacks a few years back and was not blown away. Today I was mildly blown away. This is an excellent sipper for the black tea lover. Smooth with maltiness and molasses on the back end. Milk drinkers will probably find it delicious - now I should try it with milk too...



  9. Still Fabulou!

    Posted by Judy Neary on 18th Nov 2009

    I am still in love with this tea! I followed Jeremy's advise on the blog (I think) to make this decaffinated. I enjoy infusion after infusion.



  10. I was right!

    Posted by Judy Neary on 29th Jul 2009

    This does make great iced tea!



  11. Great cup of tea!

    Posted by Judy Neary on 25th Mar 2009

    I actually bought a sample of this for my husband to try. His standard is Lapsang Souchong and since this was described as "malty" I thought he would enjoy it. I tried it first and love it! It actually has body and a wonderful tea taste. I'm thinking this will make great iced tea also. Perfect on a rainy afternoon with a few warm-from-the-oven cookies!









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We at Arbor Teas firmly believe that tea should be brewed to suit your personal taste. With that being said, here are some recommendations to get you started, but please remember you can make adjustments based on your own personal taste.

There are three main considerations when brewing tea: quantity of tea, water temperature and steeping time.

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Quantity of tea: one rounded teaspoon (1.25) per 8 oz cup of water




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Water temperature: use water that has been heated to a full rolling boil (212° F)




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Steeping time: 3-5 minutes




Tip #1: Use fresh water whenever possible - water that has been sitting in your kettle overnight may impart a flat or stale taste to your tea. Be careful not to boil your water for too long. Over boiled water can sometimes impart an unwanted taste.

Tip #2: Keep in mind that brewing your tea for too long can extract undesirable bitterness from the leaves, so steeping time matters! For a stronger brew, don’t steep longer, just use more tea.

Learn more from our step-by-step guides on how to brew loose leaf tea, how to make iced tea, and how to make tea lattes. And don’t forget to check out our Eco-Brewing Tips, too!


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There are five significant components found in all tea from the plant camellia sinensis: essential oils, which are the source of tea’s delicious flavor and aroma; polyphenols, which are antioxidants that provide the tea’s brisk flavor and many of its health benefits; phytonutrients, which are small amounts of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids including L-theanine (a very rare molecule that has been found in only three sources including camellia sinensis!) ; enzymes; and methylxanthines, which are a family of alkaloids that include caffeine. Each of these components work differently in the human body and a full description is best left to a medical journal. However, recent research exploring the potential health attributes of tea is leading many scientists to agree that tea, may contribute positively to a healthy lifestyle.

For a more in-depth discussion of Tea and Health Benefits check here.

For a more in-depth discussion of Tea and Caffeine check here.