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Organic Ancient Green Tuo Cha Pu Erh Tea

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$65.50
63 servings, $1.04 per serving
$8.00
6 servings
Quantity:
Price:
$65.50
  • Description
  • Reviews
  • Steeping
  • Health
  • Traditions

This compressed Green Pu-erh is made with top-quality sun-dried buds from the antique tea trees of the Jing Mai Mangjing region of China's southwest Yunnan province.  Many of these tea trees range from 800 to 1200-years-old with the eldest exceeding 1300-years-old! The flavor of this organic Chinese tea is mildly sweet with a character of gentle white and green teas. This Pu-erh is created using the traditional sheng processing techinque and aged for eight years.  The infusion of this exquisite organic tea is light brown with a rose hue, yielding the flavor and aroma of malted grains and sweet apples. The faintest hint of earthiness that is characteristic of organic pu-erh tea can also be detected. Each tuo cha is individually wrapped and perfect for a medium sized teapot or can be broken apart to accommodate a single serving. Don't forget to remove the wrapping before the tea is steeped.

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Ingredients: organic Chinese pu-erh tea



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Serving Size: one-third tuo cha (unwrapped) per 8 oz cup of water




Staff Perspectives

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Aubrey Says: This is a very unique Pu-Erh and, at first, I didn't believe it even fit the category! But its initial sweetness and slight hint of earthiness in its finish proved me wrong! A perfect tea for someone looking for an organic Pu-Erh that is delicate and has a light characteristic mustiness.




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Jeremy Says: This is the tea I drink when I just can't decide what I want - and I'm always satisfied!





Write your own product review

  1. just boring

    Posted by Unknown on 23rd Apr 2014

    I have tried a lot of teas from Arbor Teas and I really like the sampler packages. I drink tons of tea. I prefer green teas, but love other teas with good body. This particular tea was just boring. For all the fuss about it being aged, etc, I just couldn't see why. Maybe I got a bad batch. Green teas I love are the Dragonwell, Sencha, Jasmine pearls and my favorite is Genmaicha. The other pu-erh teas were good, but this one lacked personality.



  2. Subtle and light

    Posted by Joey on 16th Mar 2014

    I love this Pu Erh! Unlike other Pu Erh teas, this one is not bitter at all, but light and some what sweet. Perfect for the summer!



  3. Amazing

    Posted by Joe P. on 30th Apr 2013

    Like silver needle with more sweetness, hint of dark honey, deep mild roasted hoppy like complexity. I love this tea. I would drink it as often as I could if it weren't for the price.



  4. Similar to White Tea

    Posted by Shelley on 23rd Mar 2013

    This puerh tastes very much like silver needle white tea. Imagine white tea with a much richer flavor and darker brewed color. I've only ever tried one other sheng puerh and the flavor was much different than this (it was aged 6 years). I don't know what to expect from puerh yet so as to give an honest evaluation, but by flavor alone it's pretty good. However, since I can get a similar flavor from white tea, I'll probably stick to that and find puerhs with more unique flavor. Also, this tea says that it was aged 8 years. I always though that green puerh aged longer than 5 years was not called "green" any more, but rather "aged raw."



  5. wow

    Posted by otherwillsmith on 7th Dec 2012

    This is one of my favorite pu-erhs to date. It is all that they say in the description, but with something else that is hard to describe. Does sophistication have a flavor? This tea has it. There is something in there that I can't think of another way to describe. It's the way that these flavors come together along with the knowledge that the leaves are harvested from ancient trees to the terroir that comes through in this tea that is a pleasure to sip each and every time.



  6. So smooth, so refreshing

    Posted by Judy on 19th Mar 2012

    I received this as part of the Pu-Erh sampler. I really love it. It's mild and smooth. I make a 6 six tea pot in the morning and will usually refill it another time each day. This would be a really great intro to Pu-Erh tea.



  7. Smooth and light

    Posted by Judy on 9th Mar 2012

    I recently started exploring Pu Erh teas. I ordered the sampler - this is the second one I've tried. It has a lighter taste and a smooth finish with no hint of bitterness. I think this will be a wonderful summer night tea.



  8. smooth and light

    Posted by Judy on 9th Mar 2012

    I've recently begun exploring Pu Erh teas and received this as a part of the Pu Erh sampler. I use 1/4 of a cake to 2 cups of water and am able to get several infusings. I gave it 4 leaves only because I have a favorite tea that I love and consider that 5 leaves and use that as my gauge.









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We at Arbor Teas firmly believe that tea should be brewed to suit your personal taste. With that being said, here are some recommendations to get you started, but please remember you can make adjustments based on your own personal taste.

There are three main considerations when brewing tea: quantity of tea, water temperature and steeping time.

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Quantity of tea: one-third tuo cha (unwrapped) per 8 oz cup of water




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Water temperature: use water that has been heated to a full rolling boil (212° F)




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Steeping time: 3-5 minutes




Tip #1: Use fresh water whenever possible - water that has been sitting in your kettle overnight may impart a flat or stale taste to your tea. Be careful not to boil your water for too long. Over boiled water can sometimes impart an unwanted taste.

Tip #2: Keep in mind that brewing your tea for too long can extract undesirable bitterness from the leaves, so steeping time matters! For a stronger brew, don’t steep longer, just use more tea.

Learn more from our How To Guides on how to brew loose leaf tea, how to make iced tea, and how to make tea lattes. And don’t forget to check out our Eco-Brewing Tips, too!


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There are five significant components found in all tea from the plant camellia sinensis: essential oils, which are the source of tea’s delicious flavor and aroma; polyphenols, which are antioxidants that provide the tea’s brisk flavor and many of its health benefits; phytonutrients, which are small amounts of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids including L-theanine (a very rare molecule that has been found in only three sources including camellia sinensis!) ; enzymes; and methylxanthines, which are a family of alkaloids that include caffeine. Each of these components work differently in the human body and a full description is best left to a medical journal. However, recent research exploring the potential health attributes of tea is leading many scientists to agree that tea, may contribute positively to a healthy lifestyle.

For a more in-depth discussion of Tea and Health Benefits check here.

For a more in-depth discussion of Tea and Caffeine check here.




A national secret

Produced only in China, pu-erh processing is a closely guarded secret. Each tea garden has a unique recipe and prides itself on its own distinctive creation. Properly cared for, pu-erh tea is actually alive as enzymes in the tea are allowed to age, greatly enhancing the tea’s flavor over time. This is accomplished by introducing a small amount of moisture at the end of the manufacturing process and allowing the retention of that moisture in the final tea leaf; then aging the leaf in a controlled environment. Pu-erh is the only “aged” tea, and can be fully-oxidized like black tea or unoxidized like green tea. Qing Cha (sometimes referred to as “raw” or “green” pu-erh) is the oldest and most famous version of pu-erh processing. Shu Cha (“ripe” or “cooked” pu-erh) is an accelerated version of Qing Cha that was developed in 1972 to help meet consumer demand. Both methods can produce an excellent tea that improves in value and taste with time, and can be finished as loose leaf tea or pressed into shapes.

Pu-erhs that have been aged for 10, 15 or even 25 years and beyond are typically unavailable outside China and served only to high ranking officials and dignitaries.

For information on other traditions or to submit your own tea tradition visit our Tea Traditions section.