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Organic Chocolate Pu Erh Tea

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$32.50

  • Description
  • Reviews
  • Steeping
  • Health
  • Recipes
  • Traditions

This wonderfully aromatic, organic loose leaf tea combines Pu-erh, a traditional Chinese dark tea, with an American favorite - chocolate and almonds. While Pu-erh teas have grown in popularity in the US because of their smooth rich taste and health benefits, some consumers still do not prefer their unique earthy aroma. Our Organic Chocolate Pu-erh Tea offers the perfect solution! With a rich bouquet of almond and chocolate, this tea brews up dark brown with a medium body that has no astringency or bitterness. The mellow cup tastes earthy with hints of carob and almond. Add a little sugar, to enhance the chocolate flavor!


Organic Chocolate Pu Erh Tea

Ingredients: organic Chinese pu-erh tea, organic cacao nibs, and organic chocolate and almond flavors



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Serving Size: one teaspoon per 8 oz cup of water




Staff Perspectives

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Aubrey Says: I recommend brewing this tea for at least 5 minutes. The darker it gets, the more full-bodied and better it gets!




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Jeremy Says: As a Pu-erh tea “purest”, I was hesitant to develop this tea. But I have to admit, that I am pleasantly pleased by the result. Even Pu-erh lovers will enjoy the combination of chocolate, almond, and Pu-erh.





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Sarah Says: Think dark chocolate rather than milk chocolate, with no bitterness. Add sugar to recreate a dark chocolate Almond Joy or marzipan-like delight!





Write your own product review

  1. WOW!

    Posted by Cathy on 24th Aug 2013

    This tea is absolutely fantastic. It is rich and delicious but not overpowering. My taste buds just did a little jig =)



  2. Really surprised....

    Posted by Susan on 5th Jul 2013

    at how chocolaty this tea is. I'm a huge fan of dark chocolate and this tea has the same rich flavor. I truly could not stop drinking it.I made it iced for the summer.



  3. Yum

    Posted by Lauren on 20th Mar 2013

    This is the very first pu-erh I have ever had, and I was pleasantly surprised with the taste. It has a very pleasant medium-bodied taste, and the chocolate works surprisingly well with the tea base. With a little bit of sugar in it, it satisfied my sweet tooth very well!



  4. Great and curbs that chocolate craving

    Posted by Unknown on 21st Jan 2013

    Finished my first bag of this tea and ordering a 2nd. Add a little bit of stevia, and this is perfect. I do steep it longer than recommended and usually get 2 cups of tea out of one serving. Yummy.



  5. Followup to my previous review

    Posted by Mulemamma on 14th Oct 2012

    I forgot to mention that you don't have to steep for 15-30 seconds, throw this away & restart a new cup from this batch. Good taste from the first steeping!



  6. Absolutely Awesome

    Posted by Mulemamma on 14th Oct 2012

    I've reviewed other websites for pu erh tea & they were not very favorable. I was hoping that this tea didn't smell like barnyard urine or dirt or other comments that were expressed with other pu erh teas. This particular flavored pu erh is fantastic and so happy that I ordered the largest quantity! This will be one of my favorites & will gladly reorder this tea when the time comes.









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We at Arbor Teas firmly believe that tea should be brewed to suit your personal taste. With that being said, here are some recommendations to get you started, but please remember you can make adjustments based on your own personal taste.

There are three main considerations when brewing tea: quantity of tea, water temperature and steeping time.

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Quantity of tea: one teaspoon per 8 oz cup of water




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Water temperature: use water that has been heated to a full rolling boil (212° F)




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Steeping time: 5-10 minutes




Tip #1: Use fresh water whenever possible - water that has been sitting in your kettle overnight may impart a flat or stale taste to your tea. Be careful not to boil your water for too long. Over boiled water can sometimes impart an unwanted taste.

Tip #2: Keep in mind that brewing your tea for too long can extract undesirable bitterness from the leaves, so steeping time matters! For a stronger brew, don’t steep longer, just use more tea.

Learn more from our step-by-step guides on how to brew loose leaf tea, how to make iced tea, and how to make tea lattes. And don’t forget to check out our Eco-Brewing Tips, too!


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There are five significant components found in all tea from the plant camellia sinensis: essential oils, which are the source of tea’s delicious flavor and aroma; polyphenols, which are antioxidants that provide the tea’s brisk flavor and many of its health benefits; phytonutrients, which are small amounts of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids including L-theanine (a very rare molecule that has been found in only three sources including camellia sinensis!) ; enzymes; and methylxanthines, which are a family of alkaloids that include caffeine. Each of these components work differently in the human body and a full description is best left to a medical journal. However, recent research exploring the potential health attributes of tea is leading many scientists to agree that tea, may contribute positively to a healthy lifestyle.

For a more in-depth discussion of Tea and Health Benefits check here.

For a more in-depth discussion of Tea and Caffeine check here.




Chinese Tea Eggs

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A Chinese tea egg is a traditional snack food commonly sold by street vendors or in markets throughout Chinese communities. It’s a hard-cooked egg steeped with tea leaves and traditional Chinese spices, which adds a savory, slightly salty tone to a normally neutral flavored source of protein. Try serving these sieved over roasted fresh asparagus or a salad of spring greens, deviled with whole-grain mustard and cream fraiche, mashed with olive oil and sea salt, or stirred into a sauce gribiche. Check here to view the full recipe for Chinese Tea Eggs!


A National Secret

Produced only in China, pu-erh processing is a closely guarded secret. Each tea garden has a unique recipe and prides itself on its own distinctive creation. Properly cared for, pu-erh tea is actually alive as enzymes in the tea are allowed to age, greatly enhancing the tea’s flavor over time. This is accomplished by introducing a small amount of moisture at the end of the manufacturing process and allowing the retention of that moisture in the final tea leaf; then aging the leaf in a controlled environment. Pu-erh is the only “aged” tea, and can be fully-oxidized like black tea or unoxidized like green tea. Qing Cha (sometimes referred to as “raw” or “green” pu-erh) is the oldest and most famous version of pu-erh processing. Shu Cha (“ripe” or “cooked” pu-erh) is an accelerated version of Qing Cha that was developed in 1972 to help meet consumer demand. Both methods can produce an excellent tea that improves in value and taste with time, and can be finished as loose leaf tea or pressed into shapes.

Pu-erhs that have been aged for 10, 15 or even 25 years and beyond are typically unavailable outside China and served only to high ranking officials and dignitaries.

For information on other traditions or to submit your own tea tradition visit our Tea Traditions section.